Notes on Television part II

Notes on Television part II

Télé 2

Video installation is the conjunction of opposites (or, to put it another way: video installation is like having your cake and eating it, too). On the one hand, “installation” places an art-work in a specific site, for a specific time ( a specific duration and also, possibly a specific historic time). On the other hand, “video” (with its consequences followed through: video broadcast on television) is placeless: at least, its place can’t be determined — there’s no way of knowing the particular look of all those millions of homes that receive the TV broadcast.

Video installation, then, places placelessness; video installation is an attempt to stop time. The urge toward video installation might be nostalgic: it takes airplane travel, where all you can see is sky, and imposes onto it the landscape incidences of a railroad journey. Video installation returns the TV set to the domain of furniture; the TV set, in the gallery/museum, is surrounded by the sculptural apparatus of the installation, the way the TV set, in the home, is surrounded by the furnishings of the room. The difference is: in the home, the TV set is assumed as a home-companion, almost unnoticed, a household pet that can’t be handled and kicked around; the viewer doesn’t have to keep his/her eyes focused on the TV screen, the TV set remains on while the viewer (the home-body) comes and goes, the viewer goes to get something in the kitchen and brings it back to the TV set. Once a TV set, however, is placed in a sculpture-installation, the TV set tends to dominate; the TV set acts as a target — the rest of the installation functions as a display-device, a support-structure for the light on the screen (the viewer stares into the television set, as if staring into a fireplace).

Substitution 2006

Substitution 2006

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Started a project several years ago entitled Substitution, which until now, was never completed. I asked several artists to complete the following sentence: “Instead of Making Art I ___” (Au lieu de faire de l’art je/j’ai ___ ) by filling in the blank. The idea was taken from a conceptual art project of the same name, by the artist Frederick Barthelme in the 1970’s. He had at the time, sent the same question to artists and friends via letters and the beloved fax machine. By doing so, Barthelme cast his question in a bottle into a sea of responses. I’ve not seen many of the original answers he received in return and would hope that they’re compiled somewhere in an anthology of conceptual art.

I’ve always had a great interest in this type of art, a soft spot for Dada & Surrealism, and word/text art in general. I liked the simplicity of Barthelme’s project and decided to do a “cover”, so to speak, of his project by updating it by 21st century standards in using the communication technology of today – email. I emailed the artists participating the exact same question and encouraged them to use other technics such as digital images, animations, graphics etc. as a way of answering. The only rule (hardly) was that the responses remain virtual, no printed or hard copies were accepted. You’ll find their answers on the next page.

I hope you’ll discover a variety of responses that are surprising, that are often very candid, and often times are very funny but nonetheless worthy of further discussion and investigation into what artists do with their FREE time when not making art. If such a thing could be possible… I also encourage you to leave your own comments as to what you do or don’t do, when not working as an artist. Enjoy!

Jason Gaylor & Groupa-Art

Jason Gaylor & Groupa-Art

Graffiti J.Gaylor

Jason Gaylor with a couple of images from Art as Authority, produced a series of new brushes to be used with Adobe Photoshop. Graffiti Photoshop Brushes for High Resolution [Part 1] is the result. Jason you might say is the Picasso of the Photoshop brush makers, second to none, and a masterful technician to boot. Check them out, you’ll never go back to your old brushes!